Exhibitions

In the early days of steam, shipboard diversions were few and far between. Card-playing was always one of the more popular pastimes and company brochures routinely warned of the presence onboard of card sharps.

In 1891, the City of Paris boasted a library of about 9,000 volumes and more active passengers could contribute to a printed gazette of poetry, jokes, and other articles [90]. Socializing was an important entertainment, which explains the ubiquity of passenger lists [95]. Note the presence of photographer Edward Steichen aboard La Provence [96], en route home from Paris after photographing the first “fashion shoot” as we know it today.

The shipboard day was punctuated by lavish meals [91, 98]. One could arrange for a private dinner with a personalized menu [91]. After an afternoon of sea air on the promenade de chiens (see no. 12 on the Normandie plan [67]), Toutou was likely famished [92].

89. Inman Line

“The R.M.S. City of Paris (1889-93) Gazette.”
Onboard newspaper, 1891. 21.5 × 17 cm.
Morse Collection, 1328

2001328.0001
90. White Star Line

S.S. Canopic (1903-25).
Breakfast menu, April 3rd 1905.
12.5 × 8.5 cm.
Morse Collection, 621

2000621.0001
91. Cunard Line

Au Revoir Diner to Mrs. Teagle and Mr. W.C. Teagle, Jr., aboard the Carinthia (1925-40).
Menu, July 25, 1933.
13 × 20 cm.
Morse Collection, 414

20000414.0001
92. French Line

Menu: Pour votre Toutou . . . Madame. Pour votre fidèle Compagnon . . . Monsieur .
Pet menu from the Normandie (1935-40).
25.5 × 16.5 cm.
Morse Collection, 1048

2001048.0001
93. Holland-America Line

Ahoy, handbook of the Student Third Cabin Association.
1931. 15.5 × 10.5 cm.
Morse Collection, 1777

2001777.0001
94. Cunard Line

List of Second Cabin Passengers per R.M.S. Laconia (1912-17), Capt. W.R.D. Irvine, R.D., R.N.R. . . . Boston to Liverpool, June 23, 1914.
11.5 × 18.5 cm.
Irvine was captain when the Laconia was torpedoed and sunk by a German U-boat in February 1917.
The death of two Americans in that sinking—nearly two years after the Lusitania (1907-15) (item 142)—helped precipitate American entry into World War I.
Morse Collection, 74

2000074.0001
95. French Line

La Provence (1906-16) passenger list, May 11, 1911.
12.5 × 19 cm.
Note the presence of pho-tographer Edward Steichen, en route home from Paris after photographing the first “fashion shoot” as we know it today.
Morse Collection, 1085

2001085.0001
96. French Line

S.S. De Grasse (1924-51).
Booklet, n.d. 27 × 22 cm.
Morse Collection, 958

2000958.0001
97. United States Lines

Dinner menu from the United States (1952-73), Jan. 25, 1954.
28 × 22 cm.
Morse Collection, 865

2000865.0001