Exhibitions

Transatlantic companies faced with excess capacity in the off-season began to experiment with using their ships for cruising in the 1890s. The battened-down ships of the North Atlantic lacked the amenities required of more indolent vacationers in warmer climes, and the first purpose-built cruise ship, the Prinzessin Victoria Luise, was commissioned in 1900. She carried up to two hundred first-class passengers on pleasure trips to the Mediterranean, Scandinavia and the Caribbean.

Long-distance passenger liners are today a thing of the past, but the number of people who take sea cruises every year—between 14 and 20 million passengers worldwide in 2010—far exceeds the number of passengers ever carried by ocean liners.

132. Canadian Pacific Line

Empress of Britain (1931-40)
Apartment Plan. 1933. 122 × 92 cm.
Morse Collection, 1695

2001695.0001
133. Hamburg-American Line

Cruises 1910 to West Indies and South America as far south as Straits of Magellan.
Brochure, December 1909. 28 × 22 cm.
Morse Collection, 2459

2002459.0001
134. Swedish American Line

West Indies Cruises 1931, 1932.
The New De Luxe Motoliner Kungsholm (1928-42)—Swedish American Line.
1931. 25.5 × 20 cm (102 × 81 cm open).
Morse Collection, 1562

2001562.0001
135. Hamburg-American Line

A 74-Day Winter Cruise to Madeira, the Mediterranean and the Orient by the Magnificent Twin-Screw Express Steamer Auguste Victoria (1889-1904).
Booklet, 1903. 16.5 × 12.5 cm.
Morse Collection, 2363

2002363.0001
136. Fabre Line

Fabre Line: New York-Naples-Marseilles.
Brochure, 1908. 24 × 11.5 cm.
Morse Collection, 1144

2001144.0001
137. Hamburg-American Line

Princessin [sic] Victoria Louise (1900-1906) wrecked in Kingston Harbour, Jamaica.
Postcard, 1906; photograph by H.S. Dupedy.
Morse Collection, 2431

2002431.0001
138. Cunard Line

A Mediterranean Cruise: Seventh Annual Mediterranean Cruise de Luxe.
Brochure, 1929. 23 × 15.5 cm.
Morse Collection, 481

2000481.0001